Author: fogadmin


SANGU DELLE ELECTED DIRECTOR OF PRESTIGIOUS HARVARD ALUMNI ASSOCIATION

Future of Ghana 2017 Judge and Alumni Sangu Delle was last week elected Director of the influential Harvard University Alumi Association to serve a three year tern. A true trailblzaer Sangu initially had received a full scholarship to study at Harvard in 2005. Since then he has gone on to establish the Investment holding Advisory company, Golden Palm Investments and co-found the NGO Cleanacwa to improve Water and Sanitation in Ghana as well as being an author and TED Global fellow. It was the achievements amongst others which led to his selection as a Future of Ghana 2016 pioneer.

Upon his election as Director Sangu released the following statement via social media

When I was 5 years old, I discovered “Harvard University” from a booklet that was sent to my father from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. I asked him what a university was and he replied “where you go to get smart.” I asked “whats Harvard?” and my father said, with his eyebrows raised, “Ohhh, that’s where you go to get REALLY smart.”

In my naivety, I wrote a letter to Harvard’s President at the time, Neil Rudenstein, saying “Dear Headmaster of Harvard, my father says this is where you go to get really smart. I’m smart but I want to get really smart, so when can I start?” To my greatest surprise, he wrote back and sent me materials on Harvard, but gently explained they don’t accept 5 year olds .

I continued to correspond with Harvard via letters from Ghana through President Larry Summers. Harvard was never about its rankings or reputation. For me it was that place where I would “get really smart.” It held a special place in my heart and was my lifelong dream.

Some people discouraged me. I’ll never forget when a European ambassador to Ghana said “my own daughter won’t even dream of Harvard…. it’s young and foolish for an African boy to dream of going to Harvard” and offered to help me get into schools in Europe, instead. I cried that day.

Fast forward to December 15, 2005, I get an email at 6:11 pm EST from Dean Fitzsimmons telling me that the young and foolish African boy was accepted into Harvard College with a full scholarship. Harvard was the greatest experience of my life. I love the school and I’m grateful for all she has done for me.

Today, I am so honoured to have been elected a Director of Harvard University’s HAA!!!

Thank YOU to ALL of you who voted for me for your trust and support. I will work my hardest to serve you and to ensure that Harvard becomes a more inclusive community.

Here’s to being a young and foolish African boy whose God never fails!!

Congratulations to Sangu for this fabulous achievement.

Future of Ghana (@FutureofGH)

GHANA NIE : A LOCAL GOODS FAIR

CALL TO ALL VENDORS

Are you an entrepreneur creating “made in Ghana” products?


Dziffa.com by FOG Alumni Dziffa Akua Ametam invites you to join us at GHANA NIE, a local goods fair and outlet for producers of local food, clothing, homeware and natural beauty products to expand their reach, and introduce customers to quality goods.

Interested in selling your products at GHANA NIE? Register here: www.bit.ly/ghananie-reg

INVITATION TO ATTEND THE OFFICIAL LAUNCH OF THE NATIONAL FOOD DONORS ENCOURAGEMENT BILL CAMPAIGN PROJECT

Food for All Africa programme in partnership with the Food Donors Bill Implementation Committee wishes to invite you to the official launch of the National Food Donors Encouragement Bill Campaign

The National Food Donors Encouragement Bill is a  two years national advocacy project aimed at soliciting  public, private and civil stakeholder  participation and support towards the framework and development of a bill for parliamentary approval which will address the creation of efficiency and stakeholder collaboration in reducing food waste and hunger in Ghana through food donation.

The purpose of the launch is to unveil the activities line up for the project and solicit for stakeholders suggestions towards the project. It’s going to be a one and half hour’s programme.

In this regard, you are kindly invited to the programme, scheduled as follows:

Date          :        Thursday, 15th June, 2017

Venue : Christ the King Hall, opp.Flagstaff house Accra

Time : 10:00 am

Theme: Ghana’s shared responsibility to end hunger.

RSVP: 0247223821/info@foodforallafrica.org/food4all.ghana@gmail.com

 

NB: The programme starts at 10:00am prompt

FROM GHANA MULTIMEDIA CENTER (ACCRA) TO SILICON VALLEY (CALIFORNIA)

On April 17, 2017 the Founder and CEO of ecampus LLC , Cecil S. Nutakor presented an idea to address climate change at the Global Impact Challenge West Africa held in Lagos, Nigeria. Out of hundreds of applicants he made it to the final 10 contenders as the only Ghanaian. This year, applicants were to develop and launch a startup company around a moonshot idea that addresses climate change.

They demonstrated ‘eCampus For Climate Change’ idea, which is to use technology ’, with virtual augmented reality to influence behavior, change attitudes and safe the planet. After several hours and rounds of pitching and defending, we emerged as winners of the competition securing full sponsorship to attend the prestigious Global Solutions Program at Singularity University.

The program runs from June 17 to August 17, 2017, and will be held on the SU campus at NASA Research Park in the heart of Silicon Valley. Silicon Valley is home to some of the world’s largest technology corporations and thousands of technology-related companies such as Facebook, Apple, Google, Uber etc. We are grateful to the organizers, our team, our users, and supporters for their continuous belief in eCampus. We believe this is a win for Ghana and Africa as a whole, to showcase what we can offer on a global scale.

Therefore, they would humbly like to ask for the support of Ghanaians as we embark on our journey to Silicon Valley. After winning the competition the CEO had this to say “I strongly believe everything is possible in the Universe, but with everything it has to be in perspective. I would like to put it this way; the world is made up of humans, animals, vegetation, structures and systems. Each of these elements of the world has their own challenges, but although our struggles are singular our destiny is shared. If that is true, then I believe I can change my own world by addressing my immediate problems. Hopefully that will influence the next person, and the next person. So therefore, I will be able to change the world, as we know it. ”

Stormzy makes £9,000 donation so British born Ghanaian Fiona Asiedu can do Masters at Harvard…

Stormzy made a £9,000 donation to a British born Ghanaian student’s crowdfunding campaign so she can study a Masters in Human Development and Psychology at Harvard Graduate School of Education, starting August 2017!

Fiona Asiedu, who is currently preparing for her finals at Oxford university, was aiming to raise £12,000 to cover the cost of tuition and other expenses.

On the Crowdfunder page she wrote that she was “particularly interested in psychological development of individuals from disadvantaged backgrounds, specifically ethnic minorities and those from working class backgrounds“.

She added: “Studying Human Development and Psychology will equip me with the knowledge and skills necessary to generate effective interventions, particularly targeted at young people, to uphold healthy psychological development within this community.”

The total cost of her nine months at Harvard totalled £59,000, but Asiedu received an external scholarship and financial aid from the department she will study in, which left her to set up the campaign to raise the remaining £12,000 in four weeks.

But it took her less than 24 hours to meet her target, after Stormzy retweeted an appeal to him to share the campaign before adding a donation himself.

Representatives for the grime MC confirmed to Newsbeat that the donation -which was initially made under his real name, Michael Ebenazer Kwadjo Omari Owuo – was from Stormzy. His name has since been changed to be anonymous.

A supporter tweeted to Stormzy offering to take him to Nando’s for a “thank you chicken”, to which he replied: “Deal!”

 

Asiedu was vice-president of Oxford Universty’s African and Carribean Society last year, which Stormzy visited in March 2016.

In a tweet stating that she had met her target, Asiedu cited one of Stormzy’s lyrics (“Blinded by your grace”) and shared a screenshot of the £12,000 marker.

As the fundraising deadline finishes in June, Fiona is continuing her campaign to raise funds as surplus funds be used to fund other young people from similar background’s pursuit in Education as Fiona is now setting up a Foundation

Click Here to visit Fiona’s crowdfunding page to learn more and make a donation towards the Foundation

 

 

OUR JOURNEY TOWARDS THE AFRICA OF 2063 HAS STARTED… THE AFRICA WE WANT

This year Africa Dialogues Conference is set to happen in Accra, Ghana on Saturday, June 3rd, 2017 at Accra International Conference Center (AICC).

Africa Dialogues focuses on issues relevant to Africa’s achievement of the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals 2030 and ECOWAS’ Agenda 2063. Themed “Dreams We Dare Not”, the 2017 inaugural Africa Dialogues event will feature talks on governance and human rights, education, youth unemployment, infrastructure, public health, gender, income inequality, African economies, and urban development. The event will congregate policy makers, innovative business leaders, accomplished academics, civil society leaders and distinguished individuals from Africa, to dialogue on Africa’s future.

Describing the aspirations of the new event, Emmanuel Leslie Addae, Curator, Africa Dialogues Conference said, “The Africa Dialogues platform endeavors to move beyond raising awareness about the challenges facing Africa by highlighting innovative thinking and promoting those working to positively impact Africa. It’s about the Africa we all want to see hence our tagline, “The Africa we Want.”

Mr Addae added, “We hope conference attendees will leave with a sense of excitement and purpose regarding the continent and its role in the world. Importantly, in the spirit of this year’s theme, DREAMS WE DARE NOT, we expect anyone who watches Africa Dialogues to discover new opportunities and inspiration to dream big and drive Africa’s future. Watch out for upcoming events in other African cities.”

Providing further information about the maiden event, Cynthia Ofori-Dwumfuo, Head of Communications and External Relations, Africa Dialogues Conference, said, the event will be held at the Accra International Conference Center on June 3, 2017, from 9 am to 3 pm, with participants drawn from across Africa and Ghana. She further added, “Africa Dialogues is a unique, first-of-its-kind event worth supporting. I call on corporations and non-governmental organizations interested in the progress of Africa, to support this venture.”

Africa needs to, and can, Quantum Leap Its Development 

How?

By prioritizing the need for a skilled and advancing labor force.

A Changing Tide

Traditionally, Sub-Saharan Africa has been characterized as land and resource abundant, but labor scarce. For decades, the region’s development agenda has been mired by the belief and burden of the resource curse.

But recent projections show that from 2000 to 2050, Africa’s population will rise by 160%, turning most countries in the region into labor abundant economies. This demographic change has new and important implications for the region’s development dynamics and comparative advantage.

With rising human population, advancing human capital is fundamental to the continent’s economic advancement. The confluence of rapid technological change and globalization means skill development is imperative for countries seeking to close the development gap and become economically competitive (OECD).

It is for this reason that the work of capacity builders in Africa is of dire importance to the continent’s economic and social advancement. The work that pioneering capacity builders, such as Stars From All Nations (SFAN) in Ghana, do, is essential to achieving all development outcomes in the country because without ready and available skilled labor, companies and organizations cannot grow and deliver on their missions and goals.

Quantum Leap Career Fair 2017

Stars From All Nations (SFAN)is a social enterprise on a mission to provide education to employment/entrepreneurship pipeline opportunities for youths in Ghana and beyond.

One of its hallmark events is its yearly Quantum Leap Career Fair where the company brings together business leaders, HR experts, entrepreneurs, and hundreds of candidates to discuss the next phase of work and skill development on the continent.

At this year’s Quantum Leap Career Fair, held at the British Council Ghana, business leaders such as Lucy Quist, Chief Executive Officer at Airtel Ghana, joined about 300 participants in thinking through the future of work on the continent.

The event, aptly named Technology and the Future of Work in Africa, hosted a panel session with Yasmin Kumi, Founder at Africa Foresight Group; Paul Payne, Manager at  British Council Skills Hub; Josiah Kwesi-Eyison, Co-founder at iSpace; Amma Baffoe, Recruitment Manager at MEST, Genevieve Puni, Founder at Rectrain Limited; and Jemila Adulabi, Founder at Circumspecte. The panel session was followed by a one-on-one mentoring session where candidates had the opportunity to talk to resource personnel about their resumes, career interests, enterprise ideas, and job opportunities.

How To Quantum Leap

Conversations during the day revealed that Africans do not only have a responsibility but a unique opportunity to solve both local and global problems. In fact, Africans today are in a unique and unprecedented position: with modern advances in technology and access to the global market (the proliferation of mobile phones, social media, and tech tools), there has never been a better time to join the global movement and ride the proverbial technological wave. Finally, the veil of fear and ignorance that has long separated the continent from the rest of the world is lifting, as worlds and people connect through various social platforms.

But while technology brings new opportunities to connect and new employment and business opportunities, young Africans must also build and work for businesses that address local issues that have long plagued and continue to plague our communities and dim progress: high illiteracy, poverty, low health outcomes, food insecurity, and inequality.

The good news?

History shows that in the long term, “investing in skills development is far less costly than paying the price for poorer health, lower incomes, unemployment, and social exclusion — all which are closely tied to lower skills” (OECD).Meaning, skills development allows us to make the quantum leap to a more prosperous Africa because it inherently addresses many of the issues that the continent faces.

The future of Africa is finally here! Both labor and resource rich, generations of future Africans can enjoy a better quality of life if institutions, capacity builders, and businesses work together to bring more skilled and knowledgeable founders and workers who will address the issues of today and tomorrow to the market.

Bridget Boakye is the co-founder of YNG Africa and a member of the Global Shapers Accra Hub. YNG Africa is an online platform connecting top capacity builders across the continent with each other and employers, and candidates with opportunities for more training. SFAN is a partner of YNG Africa. Contact: bridget@ynginternsafrica.com

Diaspora Homecoming Summit 2017

Me Firi Ghana through its youth charity Future of Ghana have been invited on the UK chapter of the  global planning committee for Diaspora Homecoming Summit 2017 between the 5-8 July 2017 and we are pushing to ensure the diaspora and young Ghanaians are part of the conversation and aware of such a high level event.

This Summit is being organised in fulfilment of a manifesto pledge by H.E President Nana Addo Dankwa Akufo Addo, President of the Republic of Ghana, to engage Ghanaians Living Abroad in the transformation of the  political and socio-economic structure of Ghana.

The purpose of the Summit is to bring the Ghanaian Diaspora together to dialogue on how to achieve the President’s vision of active participation by Diasporans in the economic development of the country and to fully integrate them into the political processes.

The Summit also aims to attract the full  participation of Ghanaians Living Abroad in Private Enterprise by bringing them together with local businesses.

The four day Summit is divided into three key areas :

First Day: Entrepreneurial Ghana  – Investment opportunities etc

Second Day : Human Resource Marketplace – Employment opportunities etc.

Third Day : Political Inclusion of the Ghanaian Diaspora – Ropal 

Fourth Day: Factory Visit and Delegates Dinner

Keynote Speaker:
H.E PRESIDENT AKUFO ADDO, PRESIDENT OF THE REPUBLIC OF GHANA

OTHER SPEAKERS INCLUDE:
H.E. Dr. Mahamudu Bawumia, Vice President.

Mr. Ken Ofori-Atta, Finance Minister

Mrs. Charlotte Osei, Chairperson – Electoral Commissioner

Other Ministers, Captains of Industry and Banking.

Leading and Successful Ghanaians Living Abroad and Returnees

The conference itself is FREE. You would only need  to pay for breakfast and lunch.

KLM/Air France have come on board as the airline sponsor and offering 15% off flights for those attending conference. So anyone travelling to Ghana around this time can make use of this offer via – http://www.airfrance.fr/FR/fr/local/www_airfranceklm-globalmeetings_com.htm?eid=30718AF

To Register to attend this presitgious summit visit: www.ghanadiasporahs.org

NATIONAL FOOD DONORS ENCOURAGEMENT BILL: GHANA’S SHARED RESPONSBILITY TO END HUNGER

Each year about 1.3 billion tons of food is wasted and at the same time about 800 million people do not have access to sufficient and nutritious food (Global FoodBanking Network, 2014). This figure represents roughly one third of food produced for human consumption. Food can be either lost or wasted throughout the supply chain, from initial agricultural production down to final household consumption (FAO, 2011).The Cost of Hunger in Ghana report by the National Development Planning Commission in 2016 shows that Ghana loses GH¢ 4.6 billion which is equivalent to 6.4% GDP annually to hunger among children and 24% of all child mortality cases in Ghana are associated with under nutrition.

The difference between losses and waste lies in the supply chain stage where food is no longer usable for human consumption. Loss occurs when food does not reach the final consumer due to improper handling, packing and storage. Such foods are not suitable for human consumption and only have a marginal value to be transformed as low cost fertilizers and fuel.

Waste occurs when the product that reached the final marketplace is not consumed due to improper consumer behavior, bad storage practices as well as to the lack of coordination between different stakeholders in the supply chain. Food and Beverage Association of Ghana estimates shows it members loss over GH¢200,000 every month to food waste.
In many cases, fresh products are rejected by large supermarket chains if they do not meet certain
quality standards such as shape, size and appearance, regardless of their suitability for human
consumption. In addition, many retail chains discard products before their expiring dates claiming
that the products either are unsellable or generate negative image to the retailer. Consumer’s
attitudes and the consumption culture also play their part as they reject food that is in good
condition but with “not-so-good” appearance. Foods that have reached households are also wasted
because they turn unsuitable for human consumption. Restaurants and hotels are other stakeholders
within the food waste menace, because of the large portions served to customers. Since not all the portion is consumed, the rest will end up in the garbage bin.
The role of the local governments in setting up measures and regulations towards food donation is very critical in ensuring reduction of food waste and hunger in society.

The PNDCL 3058 Food and Drugs Act.1992 does not make explicit provision for food donations which has resulted in little contribution towards reducing hunger in Ghana by some stakeholder’s within the food supply chain.The Ghana School Feeding Programme been an initiative of the comprehensive Africa Agricultural Development Programme (CAADP) Pillar 3 which seeks to enhance food security and reduce hunger in line with the United Nations (UN) Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) on hunger, poverty and malnutrition had since 2007 been implemented to encourage child enrollment through the provision of  one meal per day. Currently the National School Feeding program faces challenges such as expansion and caterers demand for increase of the cost from Gh¢0.80p per child however with a National Food Donors Encouragement Act, private stakeholder businesses in Ghana will donate their excess towards the program.

A lot of initiatives have been launched in Ghana by public, private and civil stakeholders towards improving child under nutrition and hunger in Ghana however little or no attention has been drawn on the role of food recovery and redistribution as a tool towards addressing the problem of hunger and the inefficiencies within our food supply chain.

A study by Food for All Africa programme between 2015-2016 showed that 92% of stakeholders in Ghana’s food supply chain agreed that,with a national regulation  mechanism they would want to donate their excess food to the vulnerable  rather than waiting for it to go waste and dispose off.

Donors often fear that they will be held legally responsible if recipients of donated food become ill, and this fear discourages them from donating. However, with the National Food Donors Encouragement laws that protect food donors from liability.

The National Food Donors Act will protect

Persons or gleaners making good faith donations of food or grocery products to non‐profit charitable organizations such as orphanages, schools and vulnerable communities are protected. A “gleaner” is someone who harvests donated agricultural crops.
Nonprofit organizations that receive the donated food, and ultimately distribute the donations to those in need are also covered.

Private Businesses donating their excess food products or resources towards creating sustainable means of nutrition for the vulnerable in society. Tax incentives must be given to amount donated.

Good faith/CSR donations, made to non‐profit organizations, ultimately going to those in need are protected. The donations must be:

1) “Apparently wholesome” food.
(2) “Apparently fit” grocery products.

These items meet the PNDCL 3058 Food and Drugs Act, local labeling and quality standards but may not be readily marketable because of factors like age, appearance, freshness, grade, or size.
Slightly flawed partially complying donations, made in good faith, are also protected if:
(1) The donor informs the non‐profit of the item’s condition;
(2) The nonprofit knows the standards required to make the item conform;
(3) The nonprofit agrees to recondition the item to meet those standards.
These flaws can include broken packaging or missing labels, or items needing washing or trimming before distribution. Acceptance of such items helps use edible food that might otherwise be thrown away due to a technicality.
How are donors protected?
If the donation is made in good faith (honestly and with sincere intentions), the National Food Donors Encouragement Act will exempt those donors from civil or criminal liability which might arise from the
donation’s nature, age, packaging or condition. The law will also protect donors of food that is “fit for human consumption,” regardless of compliance with food labeling/ packaging laws and storage/handling by the recipients.

When are donors not protected?
Liability arises if a food donor or recipient organization knows that their actions will harm or are likely to harm the recipient, and consciously acts anyway – i.e., gross negligence or intentional misconduct.
Under the Food Donors Encouragement bill, gross negligence is a much higher standard than
ordinary negligence. Gross negligence should mean that a donor (or recipient organization) knew
when it acted that its conduct was likely to harm someone else, and consciously acted (or failed to act), regardless of that knowledge.
Under the Bill, Intentional misconduct means a donor (or recipient organization) deliberately acted with knowledge that its actions would be harmful to others.

Why donate?
Donation of surplus food connects those in need with edible food that would otherwise be sent to landfills. 3 out of 5 children out of the 90,000 street children in Accra who are out of school run away from orphanages due to lack of regular means of nutrition. These people are part of the city’s population that does not have sufficient access or resources available to obtain and consume enough nutritious food to support a healthy life.

In Ghana,1 out of 4 children goes to bed hungry (UNICEF ,2015)  at a time when 45% of food goes uneaten and much of that contributes to the over 15 million tons of food that ends up rotting in landfills. Connecting hungry people with available food helps combat both of these critical problems.
Donations also create savings for donors by lowering the costs of food disposal and the opportunity for charitable food donation tax deductions.

Why Food for All Ghana Programme?
Food for All Ghana programme makes the surplus food donation process easy, by picking up and transporting food and grocery item donations to the places and programs that need them. This helps
valuable programs stretch their limited budgets during a time of decreasing government and foundation funding, keeps edible food out of landfills, and most importantly, helps hungry people have better access to a nutritious meal. Food for All Africa has since 2015 been operating West Africa’s first community food support centre and have created a  forum for stakeholder’s within Ghana’s food supply chain to  work together towards reducing hunger in Ghana and accelerate Ghana’s effort in attaining the UN SDG 2 and 12.
Considering the outcome of research and report from the 1st Food for All Ghana conference held in 2016, the need for a nationwide protection offered by a National Food Donors Encouragement Act, the valuable incentives for reducing hunger and wasting food, and the ease of expanding the National Food feeding program, Food for All Africa programme on 15th June, 2017 will launch a two year’s multi-stakeholder National campaign for the passage of the Food Donors Encouragement Bill.

Future of Ghana (@FutureofGH)

Friday Born Designs Health Screening Day

Future of Ghana Alumni, Dr Emma Amoafo will be hosting a health screening day for adults and children in Branadi, a rural area in Ghana, West Africa on Saturday 22 April 2017 . As well as this,  she wants to install a borehole in the village to provide clean drinking water. Emma is  a UK trained doctor (GMC number 7494271) and regularly completes charitable projects in Ghana via my social enterprise, Friday Born Designs.

Dr Emma Amaofo and volunteer Ghanaian healthcare professionals will screen for high blood pressure, anaemia, and diabetes; and also calculate BMIs. They will then give educational lectures on how to prevent the illnesses that are being screened for, as well as others such as malaria, cholera and HIV. We also aim to be able to distribute anti-hypertensives, anti-hyperglycaemics, ORS, and simple analgesia such as paracetamol free of charge. Awinade is a hidden village with little access to free healthcare. I hope that this event will provide some medical attention to people who would have otherwise received none.

As a second generation Ghanaian , Emma am aware of some cultural attitudes that are detrimental to health; she hope’s to be able to dispel some of these through education. Years after I have left, the people of that village will remember our work as they use clean water from the borehole. This is Friday Born Designs’ fifth year of projects like this, and  she trusts that it will be the most impactful yet.

 

Future of Ghana (@FutureofGH)